About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 30
KRCB (PBS) 13
MSNBCW 12
CSPAN2 11
KQED (PBS) 11
CNN 10
FBC 8
CSPAN 7
KQEH (PBS) 7
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 4
WETA 4
KCSM (PBS) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 167
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)
discusses his book "syria: the fall of the house of assad". >> thank youpa so much fors spending part of your afternoon with us here. behal myseuld like to welcome you all on behalf of david lesch and myself. this is a wonderful session.our. we're so happy they your here.ss i wanted to introduce david lesch to you. he is a professor of middle east history at trinity university iy san antonio.nker a prolific writer and thinker ot the middle east and what is t' happening in the region.e it's a treat to have him here today. he has written his new bookyriat "syria: the fall of the house of assad", which i'm hoping you you sign all purchase debt and assigned. again and sign my copy first. he has met extensively witheadi president assad and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very impo
. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wallpaper and it has since become more sophisticated and beginning to write articles, the editor is anonymous but they are starting to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being this kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity but
very much. let us know what you think. you can follow us on twitter, at ac360. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. >>> in syria there's a sense of growing urgency and anxiety. we will get to why in a moment. first, i would like to show you some images that are quite frankly very disturbing and we want to warn you, extremely graphic. but above all, they are a reminder of why we care so much about this story. why we have been devoting so much time to covering it. we think it's important for the rest of the world to see what's happening to the syrian people. according to the opposition, a government air strike hit a residential area in south-central aleppo, killing 20 people and wounding dozens more. we blurred the most graphic details in the video, which appears to have been s
clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers h
. >> thank you upon >> brown: and now to the conflict in syria. nato said today that it would consider a turkish request to deploy patriot missiles to protect itself from syrian attacks. turkey and syria share a 560 mile border and after syrian mortar rounds landed in turkish territory, concerns have risen that the civil war fighting could spread further. in margaret warner's latest report, she examines the spill-over that's already happening. >> reporter: nestled up against the border with syria, ceylanpinar, turkey has an all- too-up-close view of the civil war next door, as fighting rages in its syrian twin city of ras- al-ain. for days last week on the syrian side, president bashar al assad's forces fought rebels of the free syrian army, or f.s.a., to control ras-al-ain. terrified syrian civilians scrambled, some over razor wire, into ceylanpinar. the f.s.a. finally took over the syrian town, but not before badly fraying nerves in its turkish neighbor. turk abdulazziz guven said he'd had to rescue his cousins from the syrian side. >> ( translated ): the fight started at 3:00. at 7:
in tunisia and egypt, then we -- people saying well in places like syria, you have divided communities, divided societies, where in europe -- tunisia you have different groups. in egypt when they had the parliamentary election people assumed that there was prince reply -- support in groups. they did. they controlled most of the policies. well, wip a few months, what do we have? we have even though 46% turned out for that election, remarkably, and the muslim brotherhood has been good in turning out people. their candidates get only 1/4 of the vote. then if you have the final round , the two plrks it was so close we didn't know the results. so egypt is divided somewhat. the brotherhood after the parliamentary election, they have carte plan much, but they discovered they don't. they have been sending in pressure from the right. the writing of these institutions. today, as we speak, in tahrir square there are smowsu thousands of people demonstrating. going for essentially more specific reference to the sharia religious law in the constitution where there is a deal where more moderates are
's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation.
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
360. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. oh no, not a migraine now. try this... bayer? this isn't just a headache. trust me, this is new bayer migraine. [ male announcer ] it's the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. of washington about the future of medicare and social security. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at earnedasay.org. let's keep medicare... and social security strong for generations to come. and social security strong
. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. offering some of our best values of the year. those little things for you, life's about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or
us know what you think. you can follow us on twitter, at ac360. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. of washington about the future of medicare and social security. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at earnedasay.org. let's keep medicare... and social se
are high and the deployment of israeli ground forces and syria now threatening the stability of the entire region. >> the situation is incredibly serious. there is a danger that is spreading and control throughout the region, and afraid to say. >> with that in mind, the german foreign minister left the talks prematurely to catch a flight to israel. what's the international monetary fund is urging european governments to take a loss on their holdings of greek government bonds. the imf says the the only way to make grease solvent. >> the move is unpopular in a number of countries, including germany. taking a loss on a greek debt, or a hair cut, is illegal. the director of the imf will be having a talk with eurozone finance ministers. "she came to the philippines to talk about the asian economy, but even in manila, christina guard was unable to escape the eurozone debt crisis -- cristina lagard could not escape the debr crisis. the greek debt is expected to spiral to nearly 180% by the end of this year. by next year, it could be pushing 190%. the head of the imf has suggested that greece may
, dropped by a syrian air force jet, right on the border, about 10 meters inside syria. but very close, close enough to smash windows from the explosion in the adjacent turkish town and also causing a number of civilians to flee across the border. last thursday some been -- something like 9000 crossed the border. rebels of taken hold of it and now the government is struggling to dislodge them. and the battle goes on. extremely close to turkey. golan heights, the request of the ceasefire line on sunday -- an indication this war is very close to the border, sometimes spills over. but i think in both cases, the israeli case and the turkish case, neither of the two countries is looking to get embroiled in the struggle inside syria. they are watching it very closely. they have responded to things coming across the border in the immediate area, but they are not interested in blowing this up and starting a more general conflict with the syrian armed forces. >> we have also heard that under great arab and western pressure, the new opposition group -- putting aside the differences, the various
or together you'll find ♪that we are two-oo-oo, oo-oo-oo, oo-oo-oo, of a kind♪ >>> syria's opposition is getting more organized. they've named an official coalition ambassador to france. it's a move seen as critical to garnering more international support for their battle against syrian president bashar al awes yad. the op sfwligs group says more than 250 people have been killed and fighting in syria over just the past couple of days. "new york times" columnist nicolas krzysztof just returned from an assignment in syria and cmn's randikay e asked him how civil war is affecting the people and the people of neighboring countries. >> the humanitarian situation is getting worse. you already have 2.5 million people who have been kicked out of their homes, and, you know, winter is coming, and just the stories are just so heart breaking, randi. first her home was destroyed by a bomb, and then her husband disappeared, maybe shot by a sniper or arrested. nobody knows. so now she's gone from, you know, this nice, normal, middle class existence like you or me to living in a tent with her kids as
of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events and an undertaking producing a series of transition issues on key issues, and research staff and by outsi
. let's get started at capella.edu >>> the parents of a missing american journalist last seen in syria are in the middle east to try to find their son. deborah and mark tys travelled to beirut, lebanon, but they're still no closer to knowing what happened to their son austin. last time austin spoke to his family was august 13th, when he was about to leave syria for lebanon. >> we had no idea who was holding austin and that is the primary reason that we have come to lebanon is to try to find out where austin is, and establish contact with him and bring him safely home. >> everyone we have spoken to and we have spoken to everyone we can has said the same thing, that they are unsure where he is, they don't know who he's with, where he is, we're hoping for answers and we're here appealing to the people in the region to have compassion on our family. to whom ever has our son right now, we ask you to treat him well, keep him safe, and return him to us as soon as possible. >> the tics say the syrian government told them it has no idea where their 31-year-old son is, but the couple was encoura
now in syria, damascus international airport shut down. flights in and out are canceled. fierce fighting closed off the main road to the airport. these clashes happening as the country's internet goes dark and cell phone communication drops out. it's harder to post videos like this one. reportedly showing shelling in aleppo uploaded earlier today. in the past, the syrian government cut off access in an operation. but this is unprecedented. the military jet and two helicopters were shot down by rebels. now, takeovers at military bases given them a new arsenal of heavy weaponry. in this attack, they used rockets and as cnn's arwa damon reports, the rebels claiming this as a major victory. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor made off with a sizable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares now a trophy of war. proudly shown off by this man. we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt any time they heard a jet overhea
rise between syria and israel. it is a fortress like no other. how did one intruder slipped past security to get his hands on the keys to the tower of london? on publice to our viewers television and around the globe. the conflict in syria has widened with israel saying it will respond with severity if any more mortars landed in the heights. this has happened twice and wise israel has responded. today with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town that fell to the rebels last week. the hostilities that more refugees streaming across the border. turkish ambulances were standing by to cope. with 120,000 refugees in camps i
in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
about this? you look what they did and the syria war, in which was they had in 2006, you never heard word one about it before they did it. why are they vocal about this? there's three reasons why they have been so vocal. one, it was designed to motivate the rest of the world, and i think, by the way, if you, you know, we know from our emphasis regarding the idea that the europeans would have adopted the sanctions they did like a boycott on iranian oil if they didn't they the alternative was they would strike voluntarily, and to think that would have happened without the israeli, quote, motivation," is not realistic. the second reason they do it is because they are getting the world ready not to be surprised. if diplomacy fails, and the third reason is to get the public ready. that reflecting their reality, but in answer to the question, we've, you know, you've -- we've not had conversations with others that i'm aware of that would deal with that, but i note for you that david cameron made statements saying, you know, also repeated the words "all options on the table," we want deploam
on in egypt. you have conflagrations within syria. the whole region is teetering and the whole region is brittle, politically and strategically. and into the mix now the israelis come with this major operation against gaza. they cannot live in the region and claim that they are to the going to be touched by the reverberations taking place in the region. >> brown: do you see a kind of political solution? and what will the u.s. role be. >> i disagree with a lot of things that was said now. but one thing i very strongly agree. there is no political solution. and there can to the be a political solution because what you have in gaza is an organization dedicated it to the destruction of israel, dedicated to killing of jews. this is what they say openly. i mean this is not an interpretation of what they're saying. this is what they're saying. as long as the threat exists they will fight israel. they are committed to an anti-sellity-- anti-semitic of killing juice jews, it's in their charter n their document t is what they are openly saying. they are not leave israel alone regard will of wha
. the tensions in recent days between israel and its neighbor to the sort of north, syria. and now this new test between israel and new islamist government in egypt. what should we be watching for? >> reporter: well, this potentially is very dangerous situation. on the brink -- on press hiss, israel attacking gaza killing the leader yesterday who by the way was the top of israel's hit list for ten years. but just as significant was israel's concentration on the rocket facilities, the storage of hamas in gaza, focusing on the long distance rockets. israel wants to eliminate the rocket threat against its cities from gaza. you mentioned in your introduction i think it is 850 rockets fired this year at israel. they fired 100 the last five days. that's what provoked the response. now the problem is that israel, it was sensed that israel's hands were tied because of their relationship with egypt. egypt was in fear that egypt would end the peace treaty. that is one reason why israel feels it's calibrating carefully the attack on gaza.poised on th of gaz yachlt they're trying this pinpointed air attacks
important than what happens in the united states, we do not cover it. we are engaged by what happens syria, but i do not know if shed a great deal of light. i know you began by asking what is happening in gaza and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are going to be much greater. they are leaving an impression there is something unfair. this is the time you need correspondents who have spent years in the region, because b
on the edge. how the conflict in syria is affecting turks on the border region. ship ahoy -- what makes the rest of the costa concordia so interesting. and the politics of bird hunting -- why malta tolerates bird hunters. the conflict in syria has been raging for 18 months, and the longer it continues, the more it affects serious neighbors. turkey in particular has felt the impact of the war. in addition to being flooded with tens of thousands of refugees, turkey has watched formally friendly relations with its southern neighbor deteriorated to open hostility. tensions increased in october when artillery shells fired from syrian territory started landing on turkish soil. several civilians have been killed in these incidents and many more wounded. the turkish military has responded in kind, apparently killing syrian soldiers and raising the threat of international escalation. four turks, living inhe bder regions, conditions had become unbearable. >> this is normally where kids play, but not now. there is no one waiting at home for him when he returns from work. his wife and children have
approach. and then there's the issue of syria. please say some words about what you see as the next steps with regard to iran, how do we see that unfolding in the time ahead, and then what's the way forward with syria? >> yeah. three things. one, you know, the arab spring turned out to be less spring. probably the better term is the arab awakening, and we're going to go through springs and winters and summers and falls, and it's going to vary country to country, and it's going to take a long time. but look, it was inevitable, unavoidable and actually a good thing that the people of the arab world should start taking some responsibility for their future. and there's just no going back. and it is very much in our interest how these awakenings come out and that they result in societies that are democratic, that are producing a better life for their people, and we should do everything we can in a smart way recognizing we're not so popular in the middle east right now to try to help get that outcome. there are a couple big threats to that. one is syria, and i'm more worried about syria in term
.s. officials say they can soon deploy patriot missiles to turkey's side of the bodier with syria. it is all good everywhere. we will be right become. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multi-vitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has more of 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. to support cell health. when we got married. i had three kids. and she became the full time mother of three. it was soccer, and ballet, and cheerleading, and baseball. those years were crazy. so, as we go into this next phase, you know, a big part of it for us is that there isn't anything on the schedule. >>shepard: the united states and soon deploy patriot missiles to turkey's border with syria. they could send the missiles to protect turkey from possible attacks. but the officials claim the u.s. is not ready to send any military equipment inside syria. the british prime minister is calling for the united states to join him in opening direct talks with syrian rebel fighters. jonathan hunt i
war. >> reporter: the war in syria is spilling across the border into turkey, the nervous turkey soldiers worry as it continues between the government troops. here, armed syria rebels operate just a few hundred yards away from turkish guards, hundreds fleeing to turkey. more than 8,000 refugees entered the area, they say, in a single day. we're carefully monitoring the situation, the official tells the journalists. there were two more wounded today. it is easy to see how this happened when you look at the map. residents describe the syria town as basically one city, divided only by a fence. the rebels launched an attack to capture the syria side of the border, early this morning, firing rockets and battling street to street. surrender, bashar al-assad wouldn't save you, they yell to tro troops. surrender, and you will get safety. on friday, rebels claimed victory over government forces and made video of captured troops, as proof. across the border in turkey, few people were celebrating. at a turkish hospital, residents and police ran for cover, when bullets from syria whistled ov
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)